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SPANDA-KĀRIKĀS

The embodied Self

Tr. Jaideva Singh

lundi 30 avril 2018, par Cardoso de Castro

honnêteté
honestidade
honesty
honneur
honra
honradez
honor
honour
retitude
retidão

Introduction to the ninth verse

TRANSLATION

A question Frage
fragen
question
questão
questionner
questionar
pergunta
perguntar
pregunta
preguntar
arises here “Why does this embodied Self Selbst
soi-même
Soi
si mesmo
Self
si mismo
A non-personal, all-inclusive awareness.
not shine in all its perfection perfection
perfeição
perfección
entelecheia
, even though it is of the nature nature
physis
phusis
phúsis
natura
natureza
naturaleza
of the greatest lord ? why does it require the touch of the force of the inner innen
intérieur
interior
inner
außen
aussen
extérieur
exterior
outer
Innenseins
être intérieur
ser interior
interiority
antaratva
Self, the Experient par excellence arete
excellence
vertu
vertue
virtude
virtue
virtud
 ? In reply to this question, the author says :

Text of the verse

When the perturbation of that empirical individual Einzelnhet
singularité
singularidade
singularity
singularidad
individuality
individualidade
individualidad
individuation
individuação
individu
indivíduo
individuum
individual
vereinzelt
isolé
Vereinzeltung
isolement
Vereinzelung
esseulement
singularização
créature
criatura
creature
personne
pessoa
person
who is incapacitated by his own impurity and is attached to actions disappears, then the highest state appears.

COMMENTARY

Nija means richesse
abondance
riqueza
abundância
wealth
prospérité
Artha
moyens
means
meios
one’s own. (Now aśuddhi or impurity is explained). First of all there is the mala discordance
discordância
desagreement
discordancia
inharmonie
desarmonia
divisão
separação
division
séparation
división
separación
esprit-divisé
split-mind
mente-dividida
eu-separado
conflit
conflito
conflict
neikos
impureté
souillure
mala
 [1] or limitation Endlichkeit
finitude
finitude
finitud
finite
limit
limite
limitação
limitación
limitation
pertaining to the aṇu or jīva, the empirical being Seiende
Seiendes
Seienden
l'étant
étants
ente
entes
sendo
beings
being
which consists in the consciousness Gewissen
conscience
consciência
conciencia
consciencia
Bewusstsein
Bewußtsein
consciencidade
consciousness
conscient
purusârtha
samvid
bodha
cit
chit
of imperfection. This āṇava mala is the first aśuddhi. This occurs when Icchā voluntas
volonté
vontade
voluntad
volition
the will
icchā
-śakti (Will power possibilité
potentialité
Toute-Possibilité
pouvoir
poder
power
of Śiva Shiva
Śiva
le Seigneur
) becomes limited owing to non-contemplation contemplation
theoria
theoría
contemplação
contemplación
of His essential nature which is brought into play jeu
jogo
juego
play
lila
lîlâ
game
by the absolute Absolu
Absoluto
Absolute
Absoluteness
Bhairava
Paramaśiva
Freedom Freiheit
liberté
liberdade
freedom
liberdad
eleutheria
svātantrya
Atiguna
of Śiva Himself.

Jñānaśakti (the power of knowledge connaissance
gnosis
intuition intellectuelle
gnôsis
connaître
conhecer
gnose
knowledge
know
conocer
conocimiento
conhecimento
jnāna
jnana
) being polluted by the five kañcukas or coverings (of Māyā Maya
maya
Mâyâ
Māyā
illusion
ilusão
ilusión
) arisen from that (āṇava-mala) gradually acquires limitation in the sphere of difference so that its omniscience becomes reduced to limited knowledge and at last it acquires utmost limitation in the formation of the psychic apparatus (antaḥkarana) and the organs of sense (buddhīndriya). This is māyīya limitation (i.e. limitation brought about by Māyā) which brings about consciousness of difference among objects. This māyīya mala is the second aśuddhi.

Kriyā śakti (the power of activity) gets limited gradually in the sphere of difference when omnipotence is reduced to limited activity till at last by the formation of the organs of action action
praxis
agir
atuar
ação
act
acción
prattein
, the empirical individual gets limited to the utmost extent. He thus performs good Bien
agathon
agathón
Bem
Bom
Good
Bueno
and bad acts. This is the Kārma mala or limitation due to action. This is the third kind of impurity. [2]

Thus by such impurity, the individual becomes devoid of omniscience and omnipotence.

(Now Kṣemarāja explains the phrase Kartavyeṣu abhilāṣiṇaḥ of the text.)

Being thus incapacitated he is attached to all kinds of actions—worldly and those prescribed by the scriptures. On account of the non-attainment of all his desired objects, he is distracted by his desires and is unable to find rest in his essential nature even for a moment.

(Now Kṣemarāja explains the remaining half of the verse from Yadā . . . upto padam).

When by a firm support of the reasoning already mentioned and also to be mentioned later on and of self-experience, his perturbation [3] appearing in the form of an experient who is helplessly dominated by desires, thoroughly dissolves (pralīyeta = prakarṣeṇa liyeta) through the vanishing of the misconception of the not-Self as the Self and of the Self as the not-self, then the highest state, viz. the spanda Réverbération
réverbération
reverberação
reverberation
reverbaración
vibration
vibração
vibración
echo
eco
tremor
Spanda
-principle Principe
arche
arkhê
princípio
Princípio
Principio
Principle
will emerge i.e. will come within the range of recognition of that experient. Not that the Spanda-principle is something that comes into existence Existenz
existence
exister
existentia
existência
existencia
bios
only at that time, for it is eternal (i.e. the Spanda-principle is always there ; only its recognition is new).

It has been rightly said in Vijñānabhairava : “O dear one, when the ideating mind esprit
espírito
spirit
mente
mind
manas
mental
(manas), the ascertaining intellect noûs
Vermeinen
notar
intellect
intelecto
νούς
buddhi
buddhih
VIDE intelligence
(buddhi), the vital energy (prāna pneuma
πνεῦμα
souffle
sopro
breath
prāna
prāṇa
prana
Vayu
śakti) and the limited experient, I—this set of four quatre
quaternité
quaternidade
cuatro
cuaternidad
four
quaternity
fourfoldness
dissolves, then the previously described (tat) state of Bhairava appears”, (verse, 138).

Those who by the phrase ‘one’s own impurity’ think denken
pensar
penser
think
pensamento
pensée
pensamiento
thinking
that there is a separate substance Substanz
substance
substância
substancia
Substanzialität
substancialité
substancialidade
substantiality
substancialidad
called mala (dross) have been indirectly criticized in the above commentary.

EXPOSITION

If man is really divine divin
divinité
divino
divindade
divindad
divine
divinity
Godhead
, why is he so imperfect and stands in need Notwendigkeit
nécessité
necessidade
necesidad
necessity
besoin
need
ananke
of the power of the inner Self ? The ninth verse contains the answer to this question.

The divine plan of evolution evolução
évolution
evolution
evolución
contains two dualité
dyade
duality
dualidad
dualidade
dois
two
deux
movements. There is first of all gradual descent of the Self in inconscient matter matière
matéria
matter
ύλη
hyle
material
matériel
materialidade
matérialité
materiality
materialidad
. Two things happen in this process of descent. The empirical being forgets his essential divine nature. This is āṇava mala. Secondly, he gets confined to subtle and gross bodies. This is māyīya mala. As he is engaged in all sorts of good and bad acts, these leave behind their impressions in his mind which act as a a strong force dragging him down to material existence of further experiences. This is Kārma mala. These limiting conditions are called aśuddhi (impurity, limitation) in the verse.

It is only at the human level that ascent to the divine status can start. The main obstacle in his ascent is his pseudo-self that arrogates to itself the status of the main actor in the drama. This pseudo-self has been called kśobha in the verse, for it is this that is responsible for all the fret and fever of life Leben
vie
vida
life
zoe
. When this is dissolved, then Self-forgetfulness is replaced by Self-recollection and man’s evolution is complete.


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[1Aśuddhi or impurity simply means mala. Mala does not mean an impure substance but only limiting condition.

[2The experient becomes limited by three kinds of mala — ānava, Māyīya and Kārma. Āṇavamala is the primal limiting condition which reduces the universal consciousness to an anu, a small, limited entity. It is owing to this that the jīva (individual soul) considers himself apūrna, imperfect, cut off from the universal consciousness. In this condition, the individual forgets his essential divine nature.
māyīya mala is the limiting condition brought about by māyā that gives to the soul its gross and subtle body. It is bhinna vedya prathā—that which brings about the consciousness of difference owing to the differing limiting adjuncts of the bodies.
Kārmamala arises on account of the limitation of the organs of action and is due to the residual impressions of good and bad actions.
Anava mala is the innate ignorance of one’s essential nature. Māyīya mala arises on account of the limitation of jñāna-śakti (the power of knowledge), and Kārma mala arises on account of the limitation of Kriyāśakti.

[3Kśobha or perturbation is due to primal ignorance owing to which the limited individual considers the not-Self, as Self and the Self as the not-Self.